Surcharge News

See also the webpage on surcharging for more educational content.

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Notable U.S. Supreme Court Decisions 

Two key things occurred in March 2017. Details are below, but, in short:

  1. On March 27, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a bid by merchants to essentially resurrect the original lawsuit settlement, which was overturned in June 2016. See first column below (The U.S. Surcharging Era).
  2. On March 29, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court remanded the Court of Appeals to analyze New York’s no surcharge law as a speech regulation and determine whether it is unconstitutional, violating the First Amendment. See second column below (Evolving State Laws, section on New York).

The U.S. Surcharging Era

In the United States, surcharging was historically prohibited by the card networks, but litigation resulted in a new era.

MasterCard, Visa Lawsuit Settlement

On December 13, 2013, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York granted final approval of the interchange lawsuit settlement involving MasterCard, Visa and some banks. It was initially settled in July 2012 and, as one result, MasterCard and Visa began to allow surcharging in the United States in January 2013. For details, visit the official website (Payment Card Interchange Fee Settlement).

Settlement Overturned 

On June 30, 2016, the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals repealed the settlement, noting that merchants were not properly represented. One aspect of the settlement prevented merchants from initiating future litigation with the card networks; access related blog post

U.S. Supreme Court Will Not Hear Case

On March 27, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a bid by merchants to essentially resurrect the original lawsuit settlement. The June 2016 ruling stands (the original settlement overturned). It is too early to tell whether the networks will change their rules again regarding surcharging.

The battle between merchants and the card networks is ongoing.

The battle between merchants and the card networks is ongoing.

About American Express

American Express ended its surcharge ban at the end of 2013; see related press release. This stemmed from a separate, but related, lawsuit. The final approval hearing occurred September 17, 2014, and, in August 2015, the court denied final approval based on procedural grounds. Visit the official website for coverage of this settlement. 

 

Evolving State Laws

In addition to the following content, which provides more current information, a 2015 blog post addresses surcharge laws.  

State laws trump any rules imposed by the card networks in relation to card acceptance. At the beginning of 2013 (when MasterCard and Visa began to allow surcharging), many states had laws that prohibited or limited surcharging: California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, New York, Oklahoma, and Texas. 

State Litigation & U.S. Supreme Court Petitions  

New York: A group of merchants filed a lawsuit in 2013 challenging the constitutionality of the no surcharge law, claiming it interferes with a merchant’s First Amendment free speech rights. In October 2013, Judge Rakoff agreed with the merchants and ordered a preliminary injunction preventing the state from enforcing that law. The ruling was appealed.

In October 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit sided with the original law. In summary:

  • Single-sticker pricing must reflect the price charged to credit card users; that is, merchants cannot post a price and also relay that credit card users will be charged a higher price.
  • The NY law was not a First Amendment issue because the law regulates conduct versus speech.  

Subsequently, the merchants petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court (Expressions Hair Design v. Schneiderman, case number 15-1391). The Supreme Court heard arguments on January 10, 2017 (see related blog post), and ruled on March 29, 2017. They:

  • agreed with the Court of Appeals about single-sticker pricing
  • disagreed with the Court of Appeals on the other aspect; they concluded the NY law does regulate speech because it regulates the communication of prices

Given the second bullet point above, the Supreme Court has remanded the Court of Appeals to analyze the NY law as a speech regulation and determine whether it is unconstitutional, violating the First Amendment.

California: Mirroring New York, Judge England ruled in March 2015 that California’s law prohibiting surcharges is unconstitutional; read the related article. Like New York, the attorney general disagreed with the ruling and appealed. As of December 2015, California was still in limbo; the “no surcharge” law remains unenforceable.

Florida and Texas: Unlike New York and California, litigation initially resulted in the “no surcharge” laws being upheld. Subsequent litigation ensued within the states and now the cases are pending in the U.S. Supreme Court: